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Friday, November 07, 2003

Clear As Day  
Aren’t “partial-birth abortion” bans “late-term” bans?
No. When the United States Supreme Court struck down Nebraska’s so-called “partial-birth abortion” ban, it did so in part because it found the ban’s language encompassed the most common method of second-trimester abortion.

Don’t “partial-birth abortion” bans apply only to a particular stage of pregnancy?
No. Of the more than 30 bans enacted since 1995, only three refer to any particular stage of pregnancy. All the others apply throughout pregnancy.

Don’t “partial-birth abortion” bans target only D&X abortions?
No. When the Supreme Court struck down Nebraska’s so-called “partial-birth abortion” ban, it did so in part because it found the law banned the most common method of second-trimester abortion. “Even if the statute’s basic aim is to ban D&X,” the Court held, “its language makes clear that it also covers a much broader category of procedures.” (Stenberg v. Carhart, 530 U.S. 914, 939 (2000).)

Don’t women seek elective third-trimester abortions?
No. Long-standing, unchallenged statutes in 40 states and the District of Columbia prohibit elective abortions by any method after fetal viability. Moreover, women do not carry healthy pregnancies for seven or eight months and then abort on a whim. On those extremely rare occasions when women have third-trimester abortions, they do so because their fetuses have severe or fatal anomalies or because the pregnancy endangers their lives or health.

excerpted from "Partial-Birth Abortion" Bans: Myths and Facts